Home » Previous Page » Article:

Trailer Speed Limits: State By State

Trailer Speed Limits: State By State

Trailer Speed Limits: State By State

When you’re hauling a trailer, paying attention to what’s behind you can be just as important as paying attention to the road in front of you. In addition to commercial truck drivers needing to be aware of how what they’re hauling affects the way they drive, they need to be keenly aware of the rules of the road regarding their trailers — depending on where they are. This is especially true of drivers who regularly cross state lines. Because, the rules about trailers and how fast they can be traveling can differ a lot from state to state. Even within the same state, rules for trailers may change depending on whether the driver is passing through a commercial district or a residential district. Or, if the driver is on the open highway.

Managing their speed is one of commercial truck drivers’ most important responsibilities. Improper speed is also one of the most common factors in traffic crashes. Almost 70% of the large trucks involved in fatal crashes were pulling trailers. Meaning, a large portion of those trucks probably were traveling at speeds unsafe for what they were hauling and where they were. Speed limits for trucks hauling trailers are put in place because they help ensure that large trucks and trailers aren’t traveling too fast — creating dangerous conditions for themselves and other motorists. Commercial truck drivers who don’t pay attention to the speed limits not only put themselves at risk of causing a dangerous situation, but also put themselves at risk of being hit with citations. However, keeping all the various laws regarding speed limits for trailers straight on a state-by-state basis can be confusing.

For example, Florida requires trucks with trailers to maintain speeds of no more than 30 miles per hour in business and residential districts; no more than 55 miles per hour in other areas; and 65 miles per hour on turnpikes (unless otherwise posted). On the other hand, Alabama specifies only that trucks with trailers maintain speeds that are “reasonable and proper.” Other states, such as Colorado and Idaho, allow trucks with trailers to maintain the same speeds as passenger cars in all areas. If you’re confused about trailer speed limits by state, consult the guide from All Pro Trailer Superstore below.


Guide created by: All Pro Trailer Superstore

Tags:   Automotive Information
 PDF  Print this article
Rating: 0.00 (0 votes) Rate this article
Bookmark and share this article: